Bunting by Jen: the bunting service you need to know about


Bunting Hire

Jen, who is based in Wiltshire, is a wedding supplier I connected with during a wedding Twitter chat hour a few weeks ago. I was very intrigued about Jen’s business and asked her about her story of how she came to create Bunting by Jen. After a bit of chat with Jen and then me scoping out her website, not to mention, a bit of stalking on Instagram, I decided I just had to share her with all of you. 

Decorations for your wedding can really stack up, which is why I often blog about creating DIY decorations and buying second hand items, plus I often post pictures of bargain items I find on the high-street to Twitter and Instagram. However, amongst all the posts on this blog featuring budget friendly suppliers, I’ve not featured many who create and supply decorations for the frugal conscious engaged.  So, what more perfect reason did I need for featuring the fabulous Jen and her bunting hire business. 

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Bunting by Jen

Jen was asked to make bunting for her sisters’ wedding back in 2014; she ended up making 150 meters of the stuff, and was then left wandering what to do with all of it when the festivities of the day were over.

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Making of Bunting


This weekend my MOH and I got together for another weekend of wedding crafts. Some things that we want to get done, such as the Table Plan, Place Names and Menu’s etc can’t be done yet as the guest list is up in the air at the moment due to family issues relating to the afore-mentioned guest list. So we had to move onto the bunting.

The hardest part of the whole process was getting to grips with the sowing machine; as neither of us had handled a sowing machine since GCSE Design and Technology class.

Here are some pictures of us trying to set the sowing machine up for you to giggle at.

Now you’ve had a giggle at us, lets get down to the How To.

You will need:

  • Your chosen fabric (We had four different fabrics, green gingham check, plain cream, gold netting and brown netting)
  • Cardboard
  • Pinking scissors
  • Sowing machine etc
  • Pins
  • Bunting line

1) You need to create a triangle template out of cardboard to the desired size.

With the fabric you have chosen, layer two of the fabrics on top of each other and pin them along the top of the fabrics.


We layered them on top of each other so that it cut down on the labour time of cutting the fabric into the triangles. Don’t worry too much about holding the fabric taut when cutting around the triangles. We kept the fabric loose, so that the fabric triangles were slightly bigger than the cardboard template.

2) Once you have your triangles cut out you may want to choose a pattern for them so that you know how you are going to attach them onto your bunting line. The pattern we went for was; cream & brown, cream, green & gold, cream, green & brown, cream & gold, green etc. This gives you structure to what you are doing.

Once you have decided on your pattern you will then want to start pinning the triangles onto the bunting line.

As you pin the triangles onto the bunting line make sure you are evenly spacing the triangles on the line. We used a piece of cardboard to measure the spaces.

3) Start sowing the triangles of fabric onto the bunting line, removing the pins as you go.


I continuously sowed for the duration of three films. Free Willy, Free Willy 2 and Free Willy 3. Before I knew it I’d mounted up a fair pile of bunting.

Here is the finished product.